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Session 7 [clear filter]
Saturday, February 23
 

4:10pm

A Day in the Life of a Field Biologist
Some people say they would love to work outside every day while others admit they wouldn't be able to handle it. So what is it really like to be a field biologist? Botanist Chris Benda will take the audience on a tour of the typical day for a field biologist including informative and engaging stories from his 15 years of fieldwork.

Presenters
avatar for Chris Benda

Chris Benda

Botanist, Illinois Botanizer
I am a botanist, contractor, teacher, author, and photographer. My specialty is natural areas, native plants, and herps. I volunteer with many organizations like the Illinois Native Plant Society.


Saturday February 23, 2019 4:10pm - 4:55pm
rms. 33, 34

4:10pm

Community Science - Stories from All-Star Bird Monitors
We'll hear from local volunteers about their adventures in the field and learn more about bird monitoring projects that they have been contributing to. Each citizen scientist will provide a brief introduction about their project, a story from the field and an opportunity for audience members to learn more about how they can participate.  Presenters include: Mike McNamee (Orland Grasslands), Rich and Marion Miller (Chimney Swifts), Libby Keyes (Secretive March Bird Surveys), and Suzanne Erin (Climate Watch Surveys and Hyde Park Cemetery).

Presenters
avatar for Stephanie Beilke

Stephanie Beilke

Audubon Great Lakes
DH

Diane Hicks

Bird Conservation Network


Saturday February 23, 2019 4:10pm - 4:55pm
rms. 40, 41

4:10pm

I love the Trash Forest: Invading Invaded Woodlands
In a love letter to urban nature in the anthropocene, we rethink pedagogies of ecological restoration, reclaiming marginal and invaded ecosystems as natural habitat for children. Playworkers from Fraternal Forest will share lessons learned from a spontaneous experiment in outdoor adventure play. The Welles Park NaturePlace group will share stories about a successful nature play space built through a community organization process.

Presenters
AE

Alex Enarson-Hering

Fraternal Forest
SH

Sol Hinami-Mayorga

Fraternal Forest
avatar for Kathleen Soler

Kathleen Soler

Fraternal Forest


Saturday February 23, 2019 4:10pm - 4:55pm
rms. 55,57

4:10pm

People and Places: the Foundation for the Evolution of Ecological Restoration in the Midwest
Our session will highlight the evolution of ecological restoration in the Midwest since its origins. The first presenter will discuss the legacy of restoration in the Midwest with a focus on the contributions of Chicagoland individuals. The second presenter will review regional case studies and how the field continues to develop in response to changing land-use, climate, and invasive species.

Presenters
CL

Christian Lenhart

University of Minnesota, Ecological Engineering Program, BBE Department and The Nature Conservancy’s MN, ND, and SD Chapter
RS

Rocky Smiley

USDA Agricultural Research Service


Saturday February 23, 2019 4:10pm - 4:55pm
rm. 49

4:10pm

SPLIT SESSION: Baltimore Checkerspots Are Remarkable: Mark and Recapture Study and Habitat Restoration for One of the Iconic Butterflies in the Chicago Region / Using Radio Telemetry to Monitor Movements of Common Mudpuppies (Necturus maculosus) in Wolf L
Baltimore Checkerspots Are Remarkable: Mark and Recapture Study and Habitat Restoration for One of the Iconic Butterflies in the Chicago Region
Tom Velat, Forest Preserve District of DuPage County
Since 2010, the Forest Preserve District of DuPage County has been conducting mark and recapture studies and restoration work for the Baltimore Checkerspot butterfly (Euphydryas phaeton). Hear a brief background of the species status in our area and observations of its response to management and rainfall at the District’s only known breeding population in DuPage County.

Using Radio Telemetry to Monitor Movements of Common Mudpuppies (Necturus maculosus) in Wolf Lake, Chicago
Jared Bilak, SIU/Shedd Aquarium; Matt Whiles; Robin Warne; Phil Willink, The Aquarius Project
The common mudpuppy (Necturus maculosus) is listed as an Illinois threatened species, yet its seasonal behavior is not well understood. Working with the Shedd Aquarium, we implanted 27 radio telemetry transmitters over two study periods to track mudpuppy habitat use throughout the year in Wolf Lake, Chicago. Significant movements during one study period were initiated by temperature changes.

A collaborative approach to understanding the bats of Northeastern Illinois
Liza Lehrer, Urban Wildlife Institute, Lincoln Park Zoo; Juanita Armstrong-Ullberg and Jessica Prince, Forest Preserve District of Will County; Greg Rajsky, Severson Dells Nature Center
Bats play a vital role in our ecosystem yet are currently facing several major threats. Several agencies are collaborating in a coordinated study to monitor bats in Northeastern Illinois. Bat calls are recorded by volunteers who walk transects through local natural areas. These data will be used to determine how bats use the region’s urban landscape and how the bat community is changing over time.

Presenters
JB

Jared Bilak

Student, Southern Illinois University, Shedd Aquarium
LL

Liza Lehrer

Urban Wildlife Institute, Lincoln Park Zoo
avatar for Jessica Prince

Jessica Prince

Forest Preserve District of Will County
Interpretation SkillsADA ProgramingMentoring the Next Generation
avatar for Gregory Rajsky

Gregory Rajsky

Principal / Consulting Naturalist, True Nature Consulting
Helping property owners to discover the true nature of their holdings through ecological assessment, habitat enhancement, education, and restoration.
avatar for Tom Velat

Tom Velat

Forest Preserve District of DuPage County
avatar for Philip Willink

Philip Willink

The Aquarius Project


Saturday February 23, 2019 4:10pm - 4:55pm
rm. 47

4:10pm

SPLIT SESSION: Distribution of Flying Squirrels in DuPage County / White-tailed Deer in the Chicago Area
Distribution of Flying Squirrels in DuPage County
Brian Kraskiewicz, DuPage County Forest Preserves
The Southern Flying Squirrel (Glaucomys volans) is an arboreal, nocturnal rodent that has been rarely studied in urban and suburban landscapes.  Thought to be common throughout Illinois, southern flying squirrels are rarely observed due to their activity patterns, elusiveness, and small size.  Using trail cameras we investigated the distribution within DuPage County.

White-tailed Deer in the Chicago Area
Mike Neri, Forest Preserves of Cook County 
Deer are found all over the region.  We will look at the history of the herd and what research can tell us about management going forward.

Presenters
BK

Brian Kraskiewicz

DuPage County Forest Preserves
avatar for Michael Neri

Michael Neri

Forest Preserves of Cook County


Saturday February 23, 2019 4:10pm - 4:55pm
rm. 21

4:10pm

SPLIT SESSION: Habitat Potential of Post-industrial Landscapes / Novel Ecosystems : What's All the Fuss About?
Habitat Potential of Post-industrial Landscapes
Dr. Lauren Umek, Chicago Park District and Alison Anastasio, University of Chicago
Slag is a byproduct from the steel industry with properties similar to dolomite. Restoration ecology methods suggest to cover slag fields with at least 12" of topsoil, but existing plant communities suggest that these sites could host unique species more typical to a dolomite prairie. We present this concept and preliminary results of a study exploring the ecological potential of these sites.

Novel Ecosystems : What's All the Fuss About?
Thomas Simpson, McHenry County Conservation District
Is "Novel Ecosystem" simply another name for a buckthorn thicket? Or, is it the leading edge of a new way of looking at the practice of conservation, which rejects the past (think historical prairie or oak savanna) as relevant to our management of land for the future?  A serious consideration of Novel Ecosystems and related ideas challenges us to better understand why we do Ecological Restoration.

Presenters
avatar for Alison Anastasio

Alison Anastasio

University of Chicago and Rainbow Beach Dunes Community Steward, Chicago Park District
urban ecology and evolution; plants; teaching environmental and urban studies at University of Chicago; grad programs in biological and environmental fields; Rainbow Beach Dunes stewardship; plant and human communities in the Calumet region
TS

Thomas Simpson

McHenry County Conservation District
avatar for Lauren Umek

Lauren Umek

Chicago Park District


Saturday February 23, 2019 4:10pm - 4:55pm
rm. 22

4:10pm

SPLIT SESSION: Headwater Streams - An Aquatic Menagerie in your Neighborhood or Backyard / Plum Creek Stream Restoration: Lessons Learned from Six Years of Planning, Engineering, and Permitting that Led to Thirty Days of Construction
Headwater Streams - An Aquatic Menagerie in your Neighborhood or Backyard
Ders Anderson and Laura Barghusen, Openlands
Headwater streams, those 2500+ small 1st and 2nd order creeks spread throughout the Chicago Wilderness region, are potentially full of hidden aquatic biodiversity just waiting for you to be the first to explore, discover, and report on. If you are restoring or stewarding terrestrial habitats, learn how to include the amazing aquatic biodiversity in those little creeks on your site.

Plum Creek Stream Restoration:  Lessons Learned from Six Years of Planning, Engineering, and Permitting that Led to Thirty Days of Construction  
Zach Taylor, Friends of the Forest Preserves; Josh Arrigoni and Aaron Feggestad, Stantec Consulting Services, Inc.; Chip O’Leary, Forest Preserves of Cook County
The idea was to restore 1,150 bank feet of Plum Creek by pulling back a heavily channelized and eroding slope, protecting banks, and creating in-stream pools.  Turns out it wasn’t that simple.  “I guess you can’t do stream projects in Cook County” was a phrase uttered by all.  Extensive and costly permitting coupled with ballooning cost had us considering options for returning grant money.

Presenters
DA

Ders Anderson

Openlands
JA

Josh Arrigoni

Stantec Consulting Services, Inc.
LB

Laura Barghusen

Aquatic Ecologist, Openlands
Laura Barghusen is an Aquatic Ecologist at Openlands, a non-profit located in Chicago that protects the natural and open spaces of northeastern Illinois and the surrounding region. Laura works to improve access to northeastern Illinois Water Trails and to encourage education and stewardship... Read More →
AF

Aaron Feggestad

Stantec Consulting Services, Inc.
avatar for Chip O'Leary

Chip O'Leary

Deputy Director of Resource Management, Forest Preserves of Cook County
Chip O’Leary is the Deputy Director for Resource Management at the Forest Preserves of Cook County. He has been a restoration ecologist in the Chicago Wilderness Region for 20 years. He has worked on large-scale prairie and wetland restorations and revitalization of oak savannas... Read More →
ZT

Zach Taylor

Friends of the Forest Preserves


Saturday February 23, 2019 4:10pm - 4:55pm
rm. 46

4:10pm

SPLIT SESSION: How to Monitor 2500 Shrubs Planted by Volunteers in an Urban Forest Preserve—A Learning Experience / Rapid Floristic Quality Assessment as a Stewardship Tool
How to Monitor 2500 Shrubs Planted by Volunteers in an Urban Forest Preserve—A Learning Experience
Linda Marton, Chicago Ornithological Society and Jamie Doherty, Centennial Volunteers
Over the last three years, volunteers have planted more than 2,000 shrubs in LaBagh Woods, a forest preserve located on Chicago’s north side. A monitoring program has been established to collect data on the plantings using an app. This discussion will focus on the planning and development of this volunteer program, the challenges faced along the way, and some useful examples for building a similar program.

Rapid Floristic Quality Assessment as a Stewardship Tool
Mark Hauser, Friends of the Chicago River
The Centennial Volunteers project has been using a Rapid Floristic Quality Assessment (FQA) to measure the ecological condition or quality of areas under restoration. Evaluating these sites using this metric and the % native plant coverage, has allowed stewards to make meaningful management decisions. During this case study we will demonstrate this easy method of calculating ecosystem health.

Presenters
avatar for Jamie Doherty

Jamie Doherty

FPDCC Volunteer
While looking for activities for Earth Day, I stumbled upon the Centennial Volunteer program at LaBagh woods in Chicago. I fell in love with the work that they were doing there and now almost three years later, I have become a member of the leadership team. Along with Linda Marton... Read More →
avatar for Mark Hauser

Mark Hauser

Ecology Outreach Manager, Friends of the Chicago River
Mark has been with Friends of the Chicago River since September 2007. He has managed the Chicago River Schools Network since that time, and has recently begun training volunteers to repair gullies, monitor wildlife habitat and conduct plant surveys along the river in support of restoration... Read More →
avatar for Linda Marton

Linda Marton

Chicago Ornithological Society


Saturday February 23, 2019 4:10pm - 4:55pm
rms. 52, 53

4:10pm

SPLIT SESSION: Pilot Study on the Importance of Patch Size to Urban Monarch Butterfly Larval Survivorship / Can Suburbs and Small Towns Save the Monarch Butterfly? / Monarch Moms: Cultures of Ecological Care in the Suburbs
Pilot Study on the Importance of Patch Size to Urban Monarch Butterfly Larval Survivorship
Erika Hasle, The Field Museum and Jessica Ross, University of Wisconsin-Madison Arboretum 
Many people are planting milkweed to provide host plants for monarch caterpillars. We conducted a small pilot study to understand the role of patch size in successfully rearing monarch larvae from egg to chrysalis. Our presentation will highlight the results from this summer along with our lessons learned and plans to expand this project in the summer of 2019.

Can Suburbs and Small Towns Save the Monarch Butterfly?
Mark Johnston, Field Museum
It’s all over the news: monarch butterflies have plummeted over the last 20 years. Last summer “clouds of monarchs” were in suburbs and smaller cities. Are neighborhoods, suburbs, and towns getting effective habitat on the ground?  That’s what we think, so we’ve expanded our urban monarch research to focus on these areas. Join us to learn how more places can participate, and the huge implications.

Monarch Moms: Cultures of Ecological Care in the Suburbs

Alexis Winter, Keller Science Action Center, The Field Museum 
Suburbs are often maligned as places where consumerism trumps environmentalism, but our work on monarch butterfly conservation has led us to many dedicated people raising monarchs and creating habitat for them in Chicago’s suburbs. Why has raising monarchs become such a popular activity, and how might we build on this enthusiasm? And how might we revise our understanding of suburban ecology?

Presenters
avatar for Mark Johnston

Mark Johnston

Field Museum
AW

Alexis Winter

Environmental Social Scientist, Keller Science Action Center, Field Museum


Saturday February 23, 2019 4:10pm - 4:55pm
rm. 45

4:10pm

SPLIT SESSION: Singing Insect Range Boundaries / Diversity and Ecology of Pollinator Flies in Chicago Area
Singing Insect Range Boundaries
Carl A. Strang, Volunteer, Forest Preserve District of DuPage County 
Survey work over the past decade has begun to define the range boundaries of singing insect species in the Chicago region, down to the site. Most are north range boundaries, but there also are east edges, west edges, and strange distributional holes, some of which are difficult to explain. There also are a few species whose range boundaries are dynamic, extending year by year.

Diversity and Ecology of Pollinator Flies in Chicago Area
Alan J. Molumby, James Woodworth Prairie 
A brief introduction to the diversity and ecology of pollinator flies, and discussion of some of their ecological relationships.

Presenters
avatar for Alan J. Molumby

Alan J. Molumby

University of Illinois at Chicago and James Woodworth Prairie
CS

Carl Strang

Volunteer, Forest Preserve District of DuPage County
singing insects, forest restoration


Saturday February 23, 2019 4:10pm - 4:55pm
rm. 50

4:10pm

SPLIT SESSION: Understanding Ecological Corridors Along the Chicago River System / Lessons Learned in Grassland and Wetland Restoration with a Bird Habitat Focus
Understanding Ecological Corridors Along the Chicago River System
Andrew Donakowski, Friends of the Chicago River
Protecting habitat is critically important, especially in our region with fragmented habitat areas. Friends of the Chicago River has created an interactive land assessment tool that provides a lens for understanding the river system as a connected ecological corridor. This tool will advance a vision of the riverfront that protects wildlife and connects people with the river’s natural wonder.

Lessons Learned in Grassland and Wetland Restoration with a Bird Habitat Focus
Heidi Natura, Living Habitats; Judy Pollock, Living Habitats; Linda Masters, Openlands
The site now known as Bobolink Meadow Land and Water Reserve in the Forest Preserves of Cook County is a large partnership project which has realized in excess of 200 acres of wetland mitigation and well over 600 acres of contiguous grassland rich in native plant species and nesting birds such as bobolinks, northern harriers and king rails. This presentation will cover methods and lessons learned.

Presenters
RC

Rebecca Collings

Forest Preserves of Cook County
AD

Andrew Donakowski

Friends of the Chicago River
LM

Linda Masters

Site Steward, Somme Woods
avatar for Heidi Natura

Heidi Natura

Founder & Partner, Living Habitats
Since 1990, I have been actively involved in promoting the wise use of our natural resources through my planning and design work. It is my responsibility as a registered landscape architect, and mission as the leader of Living Habitats to understand and creatively express the needs... Read More →
JP

Judith Pollock

Living Habitats, Chicago Audubon Society, Chicago Ornithological Society


Saturday February 23, 2019 4:10pm - 4:55pm
rm. 44

4:10pm

SPLIT SESSION: Writing Urban Nature: Engaging the City Landscape in the Field and Online / Beasts of the Page and Pavement: Natural History, Both Imagined and Real
Writing Urban Nature: Engaging the City Landscape in the Field and Online
Mike Bryson, Roosevelt University
The environmental arts & humanities are powerful tools for exploring & engaging the urban landscape. This talk describes the Writing Urban Nature project at Roosevelt University: a field-based course which explores diverse natural ecosystems & human communities in our region, as well as an environmental humanities website featuring students' creative nonfiction & photography.

Beasts of the Page and Pavement: Natural History, Both Imagined and Real
Gavin Van Horn, Center for Humans and Nature and Liam Heneghan, DePaul University
Wild animals are all around us—populating our cities, roaming our imaginations. Join ecologist Liam Heneghan, author of Beasts at Bedtime: Revealing the Environmental Wisdom in Children’s Literature, and naturalist Gavin Van Horn, author of The Way of Coyote: Shared Journeys in the Urban Wilds, for a presentation and discussion about how animals can help us rethink and re-story our urban areas.

Presenters
avatar for Michael Bryson

Michael Bryson

Professor of Sustainability Studies, Roosevelt University
My teaching, research, and writing focus on sustainability within urban and suburban environments, city-based nature writing, the evolving notion of “urban wilderness,” the environmental and literary history of the Chicago region, and the applications of sustainability in higher... Read More →
LH

Liam Heneghan

DePaul University
GV

Gavin Van Horn

Center for Humans and Nature


Saturday February 23, 2019 4:10pm - 4:55pm
rms. 54, 56, 58

4:10pm

The Bees of the Southern Lake Michigan Region and Their Ecological Significance
More than 460 bee species have been vouchered from the Southern Lake Michigan Region, an area consisting of 47 counties in four states: Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, and Wisconsin. The fauna and their ecologies will be presented.

Presenters
avatar for Laura Rericha-Anchor

Laura Rericha-Anchor

Wildlife Biologist, Researcher and Author, Forest Preserves of Cook County and the Conservation Research Institute
Laura Rericha, a wildlife biologist with the Forest Preserves of Cook County and research associate with the Conservation Research Institute, is the quintessential naturalist. Mentored by Floyd Swink, she has become devoted utterly to the fact that plants and animals do not live in... Read More →


Saturday February 23, 2019 4:10pm - 4:55pm
rms. 23-32

4:10pm

The Food System Chain Game
The Chicago Botanic Garden's Windy City Harvest department focuses on sustainability and conservation through a lens of Food, Health, and Jobs. In this interactive presentation, participants will get an introduction to Windy City Harvest's work through a visual overview, and then participate in an interactive workshop that can spark discussion about the sustainability of the conventional food system.

Presenters
avatar for Rachel Kimpton

Rachel Kimpton

Coordinator, Washington Park Youth Farm, Chicago Botanic Garden, Windy City Harvest
Rachel Kimpton is a farmer and educator. She currently oversees all youth development, programming, and vegetable production at the Washington Park Youth Farm, located in historic Washington Park on Chicago's South Side. She holds a Masters Degree in Art Education from the School... Read More →


Saturday February 23, 2019 4:10pm - 4:55pm
rm. 51

4:10pm

Turning Buckthorn Into Toys and Kids Into Stewards
Buckthorn is a wonderfully unfortunate bane/boon. It is a beautiful, tough, and hearty scourge. So why not make the bully do some good for once? Learn simple tools and safe techniques to turn buckthorn into something better. Engage the youngest stewards and keep them coming back. Empower children with the trust of real tools to fuel their imagination, empathy, and ability to help the natural world.

Presenters
SS

Sean Shaffer

Naturalist, Chicago Park District
SS

Sarah Sheldon

Nature Preschool Teacher, Chicago Botanic Garden


Saturday February 23, 2019 4:10pm - 4:55pm
rms. 42, 43

4:10pm

Urban Symbiosis: A Discussion on the Impact of Natural Areas’ Stewardship on Human Communities
A panel discussion on the ways that urban natural areas stewardship benefits human communities, beyond the obvious ecological merit to this work. This panel will explore the central question of “how does our work provide benefits to the communities to which our natural areas belong?” and discuss how communication of these benefits can drive community engagement efforts.

Moderators
avatar for Forrest Cortes

Forrest Cortes

Community Stewardship Program Manager, The Nature Conservancy and Chicago Park District, The Nature Conservancy and Chicago Park District

Presenters
avatar for Katie Flores

Katie Flores

McKinley Park Natural Area Community Steward, Chicago Park District
CL

Carla Lents

Palmisano Park Natural Area Community Steward, Chicago Park District
AW

Ann Whelan

Loyola Beach Dunes Community Steward, Chicago Park District


Saturday February 23, 2019 4:10pm - 4:55pm
rm. 48