Loading…
Wild Things 2019 has ended

Log in to bookmark your favorites and sync them to your phone or calendar.

Ecological Monitoring/Research [clear filter]
Saturday, February 23
 

10:15am

Amphibian Community Dynamics, Health, and Stress Response to Oak Woodland Restoration
From 2016-2018, we examined ephemeral pond-breeding amphibian response to canopy and understory management intended to promote oak recruitment. Using noninvasive techniques, we examined demography of focal species, community dynamics, disease prevalence, and stress response on temporal and spatial scales.

Presenters
AS

Allison Sacerdote-Velat

Curator of Herpetology, Chicago Academy of Sciences


Saturday February 23, 2019 10:15am - 11:00am
rm. 21

11:15am

Bumble Bee Biology, Identification, Decline, and Conservation
Bumblebees are facing many threats and people want to know how they can help. Speakers and topics include Alan Molumby: ecology; Tomasz Przybylowicz: behavior; Stephanie Frischie: challenges and threats; Brittany Buckles: identification and rusty-patched data reporting; and Terry Miesle: hands-on photo identification quiz.

Presenters
avatar for Brittany Buckles

Brittany Buckles

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
SF

Stephanie Frischie

Xerces Society
avatar for Terry Miesle

Terry Miesle

Native Bee Awareness Initiative
Field Monitor and advocate for native bees, wasps, insects. Formally monitoring at Fermilab Natural Areas and occasionally other sites.
avatar for Alan J. Molumby

Alan J. Molumby

University of Illinois at Chicago and James Woodworth Prairie
TP

Tomasz Przybylowicz

University of Illinois at Chicago


Saturday February 23, 2019 11:15am - 12:00pm
rms. 23-32

11:15am

SPLIT SESSION: Wetland Birds and Hybrid Cattail Invasion / Nature Boardwalk: A Naturalized Ecosystem for Native Chicago Wildlife / Is Urbanization Impacting the Sex Ratio of Painted Turtles in Lake County, IL?
Wetland Birds and Hybrid Cattail Invasion
Kurtis Himmler, Loyola University Chicago
The spread of invasive plants has transformed wetland habitat throughout the Great Lakes region, reducing habitat suitability for some wetland bird species.  Hear discussion of the impact of the invasive hybrid cattail, Typha x glauca, on Great Lakes ecosystems and the implications for wetland birds, as well as  connections between local hybrid cattail research and wetland bird conservation.  

Nature Boardwalk: A Naturalized Ecosystem for Native Chicago Wildlife
Maria Jazmin Rios, Urban Wildlife Institute, Lincoln Park Zoo
From the state endangered Black-Crowned Night Heron to the occasional coyote and fox, the Lincoln Park Zoo’s recently naturalized 14-acre Nature Boardwalk supports over 160 different species of migrant and resident birds and many other wildlife. Come learn about the wildlife species that call the Nature Boardwalk their home.

Is Urbanization Impacting the Sex Ratio of Painted Turtles in Lake County, IL?
John P. Vanek, Northern Illinois University; Richard B. King , Northern Illinois University; Gary G. Glowacki, Lake County Forest Preserve District
Urbanization isolates turtle populations via the proliferation of roads, which also causes direct mortality. We tested the impacts of urbanization on the sex ratios of Painted Turtles in Lake County. Preliminary results suggest the average sex ratio was male biased (up to 5.5:1). We will discuss how urbanization correlates with this result and discuss management interventions.

Presenters
KH

Kurtis Himmler

Loyola University Chicago
avatar for Jazmin Rios

Jazmin Rios

Wildlife Management Coordinator and Master's Student, Urban Wildlife Institute at Lincoln Park Zoo and DePaul University
avatar for John Vanek

John Vanek

PhD Candidate, Northern Illinois University


Saturday February 23, 2019 11:15am - 12:00pm
rms. 42, 43

1:30pm

SPLIT SESSION: Spring Peepers: A Voice for Habitat Restoration / Biodiversity Research and Monitoring at LUREC (Loyola University Retreat and Ecology Campus), Woodstock, IL
Spring Peepers: A Voice for Habitat Restoration
Susan Lawrence, Northern Illinois University
Spring Peepers are small treefrogs; their populations are highly fragmented in NE Illinois. To evaluate ponds, abiotic and biotic parameters were measured at sites with and without Peepers throughout NE Illinois. Canopy openness and emergent vegetation were all significantly higher at sites with Peepers in summer. Management efforts that open canopies above ponds are beneficial for Peeper populations.

Biodiversity Research and Monitoring at LUREC (Loyola University Retreat and Ecology Campus), Woodstock, IL
Stephen Mitten and Dr. Roberta Lammers Campbell, Loyola University Chicago
We present the results of biological research and monitoring projects at LUREC the past 6 years.

Presenters
DR

Dr. Roberta Lammers Campbell

Curator Emerita, Loyola University Chicago
avatar for Susan Lawrence

Susan Lawrence

Northern Illinois University
SM

Stephen Mitten

Loyola University Chicago


Saturday February 23, 2019 1:30pm - 2:00pm
rms. 40, 41

2:10pm

Where Do Blue-spotted Salamanders Spend the Summer?
After breeding season, amphibians disperse into the woods or prairies to eat, grow, and live. We set up cover boards throughout a local woodland to learn where blue-spotted salamanders spend their time outside of breeding season. We looked at areas of higher and lower floristic quality, including areas degraded by buckthorn or excessive shade. Does terrestrial habitat quality matter for amphibians?

Presenters
avatar for Karen Glennemeier

Karen Glennemeier

Research Biologist, John G. Shedd Aquarium
My goal as a research biologist is to learn things that can help inform stewardship and be of practical use to stewards and land managers. I'm currently studying the response to restoration of amphibians and other inhabitants of ephemeral pond communities and would love to connect... Read More →


Saturday February 23, 2019 2:10pm - 2:40pm
rm. 48

2:50pm

Bobcat—Illinois' Native Cat
The Illinois Bobcat Foundation will lead you through the history of bobcats and legislation in Illinois and Chris Jacques will discuss ongoing bobcat research at Western Illinois University. This includes evaluating the efficacy of camera traps for estimating abundance and continued research to develop a camera study protocol for density estimation and to evaluate survival and cause-specific mortality factors.

Presenters
CJ

Christopher Jacques

Department of Biological Sciences, Western Illinois University
avatar for Jennifer Kuroda

Jennifer Kuroda

Illinois Bobcat Foundation


Saturday February 23, 2019 2:50pm - 3:20pm
rms. 23-32

3:30pm

I Don't See as Many Butterflies as I Used To. Is This Statement Really True?
The Illinois Butterfly Monitoring Network tracks long-term trends in butterfly populations. A significant decline in abundance was observed from 1997 to 2017. Declines were observed both regionally and in individual counties, and involve aggregate observations without regard to species. Declines include common species that have previously been regarded as well-adapted to human-altered habitats.

Presenters
AL

Allen Lawrance

Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum
DT

Doug Taron

Chicago Academy of Sciences, Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum


Saturday February 23, 2019 3:30pm - 4:00pm
rm. 22

3:30pm

iNaturalist Workshop
Get an intro to iNaturalist, a community science platform and global network of people making observations of nature. Learn how to create observations of flora & fauna, get help with identification, create projects, and use iNat data for restoration planning, nature education, monitoring, and research. This talk is for anyone new to iNat such as educators, stewards, professionals, or the general public.

Presenters
avatar for cassi saari

cassi saari

ecologist, ecology + vision, llc
I am an ecological consultant in the Chicago region with expertise in ecological restoration design and monitoring, from small backyards to huge forest preserves. Talk nerdy to me about plants, habitat restoration, and community science. At 3:30 PM, I'm presenting on iNaturalist... Read More →


Saturday February 23, 2019 3:30pm - 4:00pm
rm. 45

4:10pm

SPLIT SESSION: Baltimore Checkerspots Are Remarkable: Mark and Recapture Study and Habitat Restoration for One of the Iconic Butterflies in the Chicago Region / Using Radio Telemetry to Monitor Movements of Common Mudpuppies (Necturus maculosus) in Wolf L
Baltimore Checkerspots Are Remarkable: Mark and Recapture Study and Habitat Restoration for One of the Iconic Butterflies in the Chicago Region
Tom Velat, Forest Preserve District of DuPage County
Since 2010, the Forest Preserve District of DuPage County has been conducting mark and recapture studies and restoration work for the Baltimore Checkerspot butterfly (Euphydryas phaeton). Hear a brief background of the species status in our area and observations of its response to management and rainfall at the District’s only known breeding population in DuPage County.

Using Radio Telemetry to Monitor Movements of Common Mudpuppies (Necturus maculosus) in Wolf Lake, Chicago
Jared Bilak, SIU/Shedd Aquarium; Matt Whiles; Robin Warne; Phil Willink, The Aquarius Project
The common mudpuppy (Necturus maculosus) is listed as an Illinois threatened species, yet its seasonal behavior is not well understood. Working with the Shedd Aquarium, we implanted 27 radio telemetry transmitters over two study periods to track mudpuppy habitat use throughout the year in Wolf Lake, Chicago. Significant movements during one study period were initiated by temperature changes.

A collaborative approach to understanding the bats of Northeastern Illinois
Liza Lehrer, Urban Wildlife Institute, Lincoln Park Zoo; Juanita Armstrong-Ullberg and Jessica Prince, Forest Preserve District of Will County; Greg Rajsky, Severson Dells Nature Center
Bats play a vital role in our ecosystem yet are currently facing several major threats. Several agencies are collaborating in a coordinated study to monitor bats in Northeastern Illinois. Bat calls are recorded by volunteers who walk transects through local natural areas. These data will be used to determine how bats use the region’s urban landscape and how the bat community is changing over time.

Presenters
JB

Jared Bilak

Student, Southern Illinois University, Shedd Aquarium
LL

Liza Lehrer

Urban Wildlife Institute, Lincoln Park Zoo
avatar for Jessica Prince

Jessica Prince

Forest Preserve District of Will County
Interpretation SkillsADA ProgramingMentoring the Next Generation
avatar for Gregory Rajsky

Gregory Rajsky

Principal / Consulting Naturalist, True Nature Consulting
Helping property owners to discover the true nature of their holdings through ecological assessment, habitat enhancement, education, and restoration.
avatar for Tom Velat

Tom Velat

Forest Preserve District of DuPage County
avatar for Philip Willink

Philip Willink

The Aquarius Project


Saturday February 23, 2019 4:10pm - 4:55pm
rm. 47

4:10pm

SPLIT SESSION: How to Monitor 2500 Shrubs Planted by Volunteers in an Urban Forest Preserve—A Learning Experience / Rapid Floristic Quality Assessment as a Stewardship Tool
How to Monitor 2500 Shrubs Planted by Volunteers in an Urban Forest Preserve—A Learning Experience
Linda Marton, Chicago Ornithological Society and Jamie Doherty, Centennial Volunteers
Over the last three years, volunteers have planted more than 2,000 shrubs in LaBagh Woods, a forest preserve located on Chicago’s north side. A monitoring program has been established to collect data on the plantings using an app. This discussion will focus on the planning and development of this volunteer program, the challenges faced along the way, and some useful examples for building a similar program.

Rapid Floristic Quality Assessment as a Stewardship Tool
Mark Hauser, Friends of the Chicago River
The Centennial Volunteers project has been using a Rapid Floristic Quality Assessment (FQA) to measure the ecological condition or quality of areas under restoration. Evaluating these sites using this metric and the % native plant coverage, has allowed stewards to make meaningful management decisions. During this case study we will demonstrate this easy method of calculating ecosystem health.

Presenters
avatar for Jamie Doherty

Jamie Doherty

FPDCC Volunteer
While looking for activities for Earth Day, I stumbled upon the Centennial Volunteer program at LaBagh woods in Chicago. I fell in love with the work that they were doing there and now almost three years later, I have become a member of the leadership team. Along with Linda Marton... Read More →
avatar for Mark Hauser

Mark Hauser

Ecology Outreach Manager, Friends of the Chicago River
Mark has been with Friends of the Chicago River since September 2007. He has managed the Chicago River Schools Network since that time, and has recently begun training volunteers to repair gullies, monitor wildlife habitat and conduct plant surveys along the river in support of restoration... Read More →
avatar for Linda Marton

Linda Marton

Chicago Ornithological Society


Saturday February 23, 2019 4:10pm - 4:55pm
rms. 52, 53